Point of View is a forum for opinions and thoughts from XBRL US and the XBRL community about business, industry, finance, regulation and legislation, where data standards can play a role. We welcome your feedback on the XBRL point of view.

Styles Come and Go; Consistency Is Timeless

Campbell Pryde, President & CEO, XBRL US

Trust. It’s one of the most important considerations when hiring a guide to lead a challenging mountain climb. The same is true with developing standards. Only a specialist with the right skillset and experience can help build a good quality taxonomy or XBRL instance document. Find the right people through XBRL Achievements.

Have you found the right team to build successful standards?

Campbell Pryde, President & CEO, XBRL US

Trust. It’s one of the most important considerations when hiring a guide to lead a challenging mountain climb. The same is true with developing standards. Only a specialist with the right skillset and experience can help build a good quality taxonomy or XBRL instance document. Find the right people through XBRL Achievements.

Earlier (2017)

Embed Your Opinion … on Inline XBRL

Campbell, President and CEO, XBRL US

How companies report their financials can have a big impact on investing, and ultimately on the economy. That’s why issuers, analysts, investors and data analytics providers, as well as XBRL tool and service providers should comment on the SEC’s new rule proposal for Inline XBRL.

Earlier (2017)

Ready to trade in your flip phone?

Julie Valpey, Chair, XBRL US Communications Steering Committee; Partner, National SEC Department, BDO

Switching to structured (XBRL) data after using HTML versions of financial filings is like trading in your flip phone for an iPhone. Wow. Suddenly you can do things you never thought possible.

Earlier (2017)

What can the solar industry learn from the grocery business?

Jonathan Previtali, Vice President, Environmental Finance Group, Wells Fargo and Michelle Savage, Vice President, Communication, XBRL US

In 1974, the first Universal Product Code (UPC) was scanned in Troy, Ohio, automating what had been a manual process for recording sales. The first item scanned was a pack of Wrigley’s chewing gum. The UPC revolutionized the retail grocery business, using technology standards to wring costs out of a process that required the collection of massive amounts of data.