Point of View is a forum for opinions and thoughts from XBRL US and the XBRL community about business, industry, finance, regulation and legislation, where data standards can play a role. We welcome your feedback on the XBRL point of view.

The right tools for when it absolutely, positively, has to be done right.

Ami Beers, Director — Assurance and Advisory Services, Corporate Reporting, Association of International Certified Professional Accountants (AICPA); Member, XBRL US Data Quality Committee

Preparing a perfect turkey is critical for a successful Thanksgiving. Preparing quarterly financial statements is another activity where “getting it right” is critical. The risk of mistakes has significant downsides, ranging from SEC sanction to negatively affecting your company stock price.

Fix state & local government reporting. Here’s how.

State CAFRs and Annual Financial Reports in standardized, computer-readable format will improve the ability to collect, aggregate, and analyze data, giving investors and policymakers the ability to make more timely, better decisions, while reducing the cost of data collection and analysis.

The Future is NOW

David Tauriello, Vice President, Operations, XBRL US

The inline XBRL specification has been in widespread use around the world for years. The SEC’s recent decision to adopt inline filing as a requirement brings significant benefits for all stakeholders and challenges for companies that have not yet mastered the craft of digital financial storytelling.

Fact or Fiction? Let’s Set the Record Straight

Al Berkeley, Chairman, Princeton Capital
H.R. 5054 aims to reduce the burden on small filers, through an XBRL exemption. While the intent is good, the repercussions of the passage of an exemption like this, are anything but. Read on for the real facts.

US Public Companies Need to Stay Relevant In a Digital Age

John Turner, CEO, XBRL International

US lawmakers should reject the suggestion that smaller listed companies’ Fintech-friendly data be replaced with paper. It would be like telling smaller film makers that they can’t use Netflix anymore, but instead need to market their work on VHS tape.